Category: Outside Reading

Just Because You Delete, Doesn’t Mean I Can’t Reply…

So, my friend Jess (Diary of a Mom), shared a fantastic post from M at Invisible Strings – this is like playing a game of neurodiversity telephone… hah! – regarding autism not being a mental illness, but not insisting on autism NOT being a mental illness, because that shifts the negative stigma onto those who […]

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OUTSIDE READING: I’m Sorry… My Eyes Are WHAT?

I don’t like linking to pages which include “Aspie” in the title because y’all know how I feel about that word, but this is a good takedown of an article recently published in the New Yorker which has the following within it:   “For parents of autistic kids, awareness is desperately important. It’s a searing […]

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OUTSIDE READING: Why Can’t We All Get Along?!?

A fantastic follow-up read to my blog post from earlier… Leah gets it. We can’t get along if you’re exploiting your child’s diagnosis to further your overdramatic egotistical ploy for a pity party. Check your feelings at the door. Let’s work together to get your kid on a fulfilling and happy pathway to success, whatever success […]

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OUTSIDE READING: Behavior Plan For Parents of Newly Diagnosed Autistic Children

“Your feelings about autism are constructed by living in a world that fears and stigmatizes disabled lives. Your distress about an autism diagnosis are most certainly because of these unhealthy messages. Please remember that your behavior in regards to your child’s diagnosis is a choice. Signing this behavior plan means that you will always put […]

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OUTSIDE READING: Is Everyone “a Little Autistic”?

“If everyone were a little bit autistic, Salvation Army bell ringers would be illegal. If everyone were a little bit autistic, nothing ever would have strobe lights. Ever. Fluorescent lights, sirens, shirt tags, sock seams — these wouldn’t exist. There would be a strong social taboo against dragging a chair across the floor and making […]

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OUTSIDE READING: Is a ‘Spectrum’ the Best Way to Talk About Autism?

This is a REALLY, REALLY good read on why I tend to lash out at people who insist on using the “spectrum” as a linear way to classify autistic people. Nope. Doesn’t work that way. And this does a pretty solid job explaining why. “If I tell people that I have two autistic brothers, I […]

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OUTSIDE READING: 10 ‘Autism Interventions’ for Families Embracing the Neurodiversity Paradigm

THIS ARTICLE IS SO WONDERFULLY ACCURATE!!! And in the comments on the Respectfully Connected FB post, Bri from RC elaborated on number 9: “# 9 recommends critically thinking about whether we would ask a non-autistic child to engage in this therapy. If the answer is no, it is a good indicator that we should think carefully about […]

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OUTSIDE READING: 10 Things Autistic Kids Pick Up Quicker When Not Bullied

“As an educator, I’d like to say this: Why in corn’s name are you waiting for a child to be abused by their peers in order to ‘promote social justice, tolerance, respect, and acceptance’? The time for that promotion is all the time, no matter who is or is not in your current classroom. If […]

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OUTSIDE READING: 9 Autism Facts the Presidential Candidates (And You) Need to Know

Thanks to Mashable for publishing this very on-point and necessary breakdown of things the public should know. And kudos to Julia Bascom from The Autistic Self Advocacy Network for helping explain things the way they should be explained. Please share this article to spread the word, lest more misinformation take hold in the minds of the general public.

OUTSIDE READING: Why Adults Get a Pass When Kids Don’t

“What neurodivergent kids are really learning when we call events expected and unexpected is what we neurotypicals find comfortable and pleasing and what we find uncomfortable and displeasing. Unexpected language patterns are ‘non-functional’ because they are not goal-oriented, they don’t accomplish a task. How boring.” – “Functional language,” shoes, and why adults get a pass when […]

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