Tag Archives: links

OUTSIDE READING: I’m Sorry… My Eyes Are WHAT?

I don’t like linking to pages which include “Aspie” in the title because y’all know how I feel about that word, but this is a good takedown of an article recently published in the New Yorker which has the following within it:   “For parents of autistic kids, awareness is desperately important. It’s a searing […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING: Behavior Plan For Parents of Newly Diagnosed Autistic Children

“Your feelings about autism are constructed by living in a world that fears and stigmatizes disabled lives. Your distress about an autism diagnosis are most certainly because of these unhealthy messages. Please remember that your behavior in regards to your child’s diagnosis is a choice. Signing this behavior plan means that you will always put […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING: Is Everyone “a Little Autistic”?

“If everyone were a little bit autistic, Salvation Army bell ringers would be illegal. If everyone were a little bit autistic, nothing ever would have strobe lights. Ever. Fluorescent lights, sirens, shirt tags, sock seams — these wouldn’t exist. There would be a strong social taboo against dragging a chair across the floor and making […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING: Is a ‘Spectrum’ the Best Way to Talk About Autism?

This is a REALLY, REALLY good read on why I tend to lash out at people who insist on using the “spectrum” as a linear way to classify autistic people. Nope. Doesn’t work that way. And this does a pretty solid job explaining why. “If I tell people that I have two autistic brothers, I […]

Continue reading…

Sometimes a Little Right Isn’t Enough

For everyone wanting to rave about how wonderful Sesame Street is for creating an autistic muppet… they haven’t. They created a cartoon character and a bunch of videos pushing a mostly negative agenda. Please read this write-up of the materials and why Sesame Street needs to start over with this initiative. Sometime a little right […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING: Why Adults Get a Pass When Kids Don’t

“What neurodivergent kids are really learning when we call events expected and unexpected is what we neurotypicals find comfortable and pleasing and what we find uncomfortable and displeasing. Unexpected language patterns are ‘non-functional’ because they are not goal-oriented, they don’t accomplish a task. How boring.” – “Functional language,” shoes, and why adults get a pass when […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING – 7 Reasons To Stop Calling Disabled People Inspirational

  Stop posting inspiration porn; all your feel-good news stories about how a team came together to allow a disabled kid to make the last basket during the game or the head cheerleader accompanied the disabled boy to prom or the community came together to show up at an 11-year old stranger’s birthday party, because […]

Continue reading…

OUTSIDE READING – Not On My Wall… Boundaries and Entitlement

“I have even seen some parents come into the space of an Autistic person, someone with lived experience – and when it has been explained that ‘Light it up Blue’ and ‘Puzzle Pieces’ and ‘Awareness’ are offensive and even triggering, these same people have continued to defend their position. What if instead of insisting their […]

Continue reading…

Choose Your Internet Words Wisely

“I talk all the time about why I think it’s so absolutely, positively, completely necessary to be respectful of our children (and their neurology) when we talk about them online. I talk about how desperately necessary it is to respect their privacy. And, above all, I preach my gospel of never publicly saying anything about […]

Continue reading…

Internalized Ableism Doesn’t Mean You Truly Want a “Cure”

“Prejudice against such minorities, he says, does not usually limit their abilities to find love or friends. His deficits, he explains, are social. He’s tried to make friends and interact in person more (for example, he’s joined support groups for people with depression, and another for people on the autism spectrum), but the crippling loneliness […]

Continue reading…